Doug Scott CBE - The 3 Peaks Discovery Point, Dundee

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An Illustrated Talk on Mountain Climbing Doug Scott THE THREE PEAKS Everest - K2 - Kangchenjunga

Tuesday 27th October Discovery Point, Dundee 7pm Tickets £15 (£12 conc.) from TISO Dundee (01382 221153) & ROKPA Dundee (01382 872020)

Widely acknowledged as one of the greatest mountaineers of all time, Doug Scott has made numerous significant first ascents in the Himalaya. In a brand new and stunningly illustrated talk, Doug tells of his adventures and insights on the world’s three highest mountains.

Everest: at sunset on the 24 September 1975, Doug Scott and Dougal Haston reached the summit of Everest, having made the first ascent of its very difficult South West Face - they were also the first Britons to climb the mountain. On their descent, they survived without oxygen or sleeping bags, the highest bivouac ever and at 28,700 feet just one hundred metres down from the summit. This was a ground breaking effort etched into the annals of mountaineering.

It also marked the end of an era. This siege style expedition, brilliantly led by Chris Bonington, demonstrated that with enough experienced climbers and resources and with reasonable weather, anything was possible. Since uncertainty of outcome is the essence of adventure and one of the main ingredients of a great climb, Doug and his friends naturally tackled their next big climb in lightweight style.

Kangchenjunga: this is the world’s third highest summit, but a much more technically demanding and dangerous mountain than Everest. After two and a half months of climbing through one storm after another Doug Scott with Peter Boardman and Joe Tasker reached a point just 10 feet below the summit - in deference to the local people they left the summit untouched it being regarded as the dwelling place of their deities. This was the third ascent of the mountain, but the first in a lightweight style without bottled oxygen and by a new route. This was a huge step into the unknown, since none of the world’s big mountains had then been climbed by a small team and without oxygen being available. Doug considers this the most demanding of all his expeditions, as the outcome was uncertain until the very end.

K2: “Third time lucky” doesn’t always hold true. In 1978 Doug was high on the world’s second highest mountain, roped to his great friend Nick Escourt, when they were avalanched. The rope broke and Nick was swept to his death leaving Doug to tell the tale. He would return to this dangerous mountain in 1983, when with Andy Parkin, Roger Baxter-Jones and Jean Afanassieff they pioneered a new route up the South Pillar of K2. High on the mountain, on The Shoulder, Afanassief was struck down by Cerebral Oedema, his fellow climbers were, in an heroic rescue able to safely evacuate him, but would be denied the summit. Despite three further attempts Doug never climbed K2, but feels that “two out of three ain’t bad”.

This is not simply a talk for committed climbers and mountaineers however. With his dry humour, tales of death-defying bravery, heart-tugging accounts of the lives of the mountain peoples he encounters, added to his spectacular photography, everyone should be riveted.

Doug Scott has conquered more new Himalayan routes and more in lightweight style than any other British climber, and possibly any other man alive. His respect for the earth and his passion for the far wild places has led him to take an “environmentally responsible” attitude to his mountaineering and whenever possible he tackles routes in Alpine-style – climbing fast and light and without ropes and oxygen, or indeed “expedition” back-up, thereby removing the risk of leaving debris on the mountains – a problem that is increasingly being recognised on Everest.

With his more extreme climbing days behind him now however, Doug uses his incredible energy, drive and determination in another very positive way. But it is one which has not seen him turn his back on the Himalayas. For with Community Action Nepal, he has set about helping some of the poorest peoples of the world. Touched by the tales of challenging conditions experienced in the impoverished mountain homes by the porters and sherpas who became his friends on many of his expeditions, he has established over 40 on-going projects to allow these resilient and ever-cheerful people to help themselves. Nepal has been recognised by UNESCO as the fourth poorest country in the world, the poorest in Asia and the mountain villages CAN helps are in the areas which receive the least of any funding which is available.

Traditionally, young men from these communities go into the trekking industry. Community Action Nepal projects bring aid in the form of clean water supplies, schools and healthcare posts to these regions. All the funds from the event will go entirely to charity and be split equally between CAN and ROKPA.

Doug will be joined at this fundraising event by Gelong Karma Jiga. Karma Jiga is founding director and meditation teacher for many Buddhist groups throughout the UK including Rokpa Dundee, Aberdeen & Highlands. Doug’s interest in the charitable work of ROKPA began during his time in the Himalaya’s and Karma Jiga will join him to give a fascinating introductory talk on the work of the Rokpa Trust throughout Scotland. Karma Jiga is a lifelong Tibetan Buddhist monk and has worked alongside Doug for the last 5 years to raise money for both CAN and ROKPA. Funds from this evenings lecture will be split equally between these charities.

Funds raised by Doug through his work for CAN go directly to the people it is designed to help, with overheads being met by the sale of goods including fair trade Nepalese crafts in the West.

He also sells and auctions large posters and limited edition singed prints of his superb photography at the lectures to further assist with fundraising and will have a selection of these, and books he has written, with him at all the venues on this tour.

More details of all of Doug's talks can be found at www.canepal.org.uk/dslectures.htm, or by telephoning 0845 458 9527.

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